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Dan Jordan

Songwriter | Storyteller

 
 
 
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Behind the Music

About Dan Jordan.

Born and raised in Wales, slowly shifting across the map, rolling from sleepy, tucked away towns and villages, (the types of places whose names seem  hazily familiar but are scarcely recalled) and onward to the city-scapes, all the while taking in off-the-cuff inspiration, inspiration that is then moulded into what could be called “songs”. A collection of intimate stories and broad observations. A disgruntled library that gathers dust in the mind until they are call upon once more.


A Conversation:


There has rarely been a moment where Dan has not been part of a music scene (in some form or another). Dan explains, “It seems that, wherever you are or wherever you base yourself, musicians just…emerge, they surround you and form around each other as if there is a natural instinct that draws us to like-minded people”.


After years of playing on many other’s songs, Dan started to write more and more of his own tales and musings. On writing as part of a band, Dan says, "There are always things that you feel need to be said or stories that you want to tell but they don’t always translate whilst wearing another man’s suit - and I mean that graciously”. And so, song writing became more of a solo endeavour. He explains that, “it was a nice feeling to ‘come home’, to find my own way of conveying a story for the first time without having to stray into the potentially muddy rivers, caused by sharing a song between many cooks”.


With the exception of the obvious first album (seemingly written “in a haze” with Bob Dylan records playing on his mind) Dan says that any influences, either musically or artistically, have never been, “consciously mimicked on the records”. In the case of the first album, Dan was, “looking for a simple, musical style as a means of direction”. After this, he realised that, as long as the core stories are there, this "style" could find him instead and so the ethos seemed to be "let's see what comes out naturally". If any influences have indeed seeped into the way Dan writes over the years since, then he hasn’t noticed and nor does he seem to really care. Instead, Dan explains, “I love hearing people tell me who my influences are instead – musically, I have no clue! I've always thought that one is not the best person to describe oneself, so in that regard, I don't have an opinion either way”. Everything and nothing?


In a way, it may be that any limitations could very well be Dan’s greatest distinction. In his own words, “I have never called myself a guitarist, a pianist, a singer. I'd feel like a fraud if I were to label myself with these wonderful titles. What is important to me is that I can convey my stories in a simple manner”. Dan goes on to explain that, “Generally, I try not to put too much thought into the music. Once the chords are in place, I usually run with the first idea I get for any of the parts. It’s very natural, fluid. They’re usually recorded in one or two takes and as soon as that track is down, I forget about it and move on. It’s a quick process. It takes longer to re-learn the songs so that we can play them live! But I like this way of recording and writing, it’s organic in the way that they seem a lot more alive when improvised, you get lovely, nuanced moments to your song this way, it’s very of the moment, not forced”.


The songs are also recorded using scrounged instruments and recording spaces that were 'utilize' when the opportunities presented themselves. This may go to some way in explaining the sometimes erratic soundscapes and crude recordings within the older records. As Dan explains, “You don't need to pick up the best or most fancy instruments to get your point across. Hopefully, I like to think that I can scrape by on the merit of a half decent song or tale”. 


Now a trio, Dan’s good friends Sam and Patti (who both feature on the newer albums) make up "The Warbirds". With Sam’s wonderful electric guitar touch, tone and expression and Patti’s technical and soulful playing style on violin, “The Warbirds” are a perfect backing to Dan’s story-telling. Recording new material as and when the mood hits them,  they have also taken the time to re-work all the ‘classics’ from back- catalogue to play live and are very much looking forward to meeting you all down the road soon!

 

News

| NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND PODCAST |

  OCT, 2021

   The all-new "Dan Jordan Youtube" page is finally here and yes - this now includes (in it's entirety), the brand-new album; "Road To Ruin"!

Dan Jordan on YouTube.


   Ah, but wait - there's more! Why not click here and take a listen to "Episode 1" of the brand-new podcast; "Dan Talks Music", where Dan reflects on his musical influences?

   As always, thank you all for your support and kindness. Stay safe!

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| NEW ALBUM, "ROAD TO RUIN" - AVAILABLE NOW. |

  September, 2021

Well hello everybody. Hope you are all doing well?! 

   

As like most artists, Dan has been busy working away on some new tunes during the lock-down. Well, 

exciting times indeed because, the new album; "Road To Ruin", is finally here!

    

Marking Dan Jordan's 8th solo release, "Road To Ruin" is now available to stream and download. Check it out and let us know what you think:

LISTEN ON SPOTIFY: click here.

LISTEN ON APPLE MUSIC: click here.

   

   As always, thank you all for your support and kindness. Stay safe!

"Road To Ruin" written by: Dan Jordan.

Performed by: Dan Jordan and featuring: Sam Harman, Matthew Taylor, Matthew White & Mark Thomas.

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| DAN JORDAN - ON THE AIRWAVES |

   May, 2021



This week, tune in and listen to some fantastic stations from the UK, USA, Canada and Australia, all of which will be featuring Dan Jordan's brand-new single; "Slow Burn":


SUNDAY 16th MAY:


  • MIDDAY - U & I Radio (Wales/Cardiff)   |  Listen live: click here.

  • 3PM - KB Indy Radio (Canada)  |  Listen live: click here.

  • 8PM - Blues & Roots Radio (Canada)  |  Listen live: click here. 

WEDNESDAY 19th MAY:


  • 7PM – Banks Radio (Australia)  |  Listen live: click here.

  • 8PM - U & I Radio (Wales/Cardiff)   |  Listen live: click here.

THURSDAY 20th MAY:


  • 11PM - Fasching Web Radio (Canada) |  |  Listen live: click here. 


FRIDAY 21st MAY:


  • 8PM - Radio Wigwam (UK)  |  Listen live: click here. 


*A big thank you, to you all for playing our songs!*

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| DAN JORDAN - FEATURED ARTIST ON "PURE WEST RADIO"! |

   October, 2020

   This Sunday be sure to tune into "Pure West Radio" where Dan Jordan will be the featured "artist of the week". The hour-long show will feature songs from the latest studio release "Smoke Signals" as well as some background on the recording process as well as music from local artists.

   As always, a big thank you goes out to the great host BB Skone for his amazing support! :)


7PM - Sunday 11th Oct: Listen live here: Pure West Radio

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| "LIVE TAKES" (PART II) - OUT NOW! |

   September, 2020

   Before the lock-down of 2020, "The Warbirds" walked into a small room, drank and recorded many of their tunes as they like to play them live. Dan, Sam and Patti are now pleased to say that you can now listen to the second half of the "Live Takes" session.

   A great many songs were recorded so why not take a listen to "Live Takes - Part 1"and let us know what you think on our facebook page? As always, a big thank you for all of your amazing support! :)


LIVE TAKES (PART I):

Spotify: click here

iTunes: click here

LIVE TAKES (PART II):

Spotify: click here

iTunes: click here

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| "SMOKE SIGNALS", THE NEW E.P. - AVAILABLE NOW! |

  September, 2020

Available now on digital platforms, the new E.P. by Dan Jordan, featuring 4 original tracks:

"Darlin', Don't Go Easy"

"Water Horse"

"Bronze And Blue"

"Assume I'm Wearing Black"

Take a listen by clicking on the links below and, as always, a big thank you for all of your amazing support! :)

Spotify: click here

iTunes: click here

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Discography

 

Road To Ruin

2021

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Slow Burn

Rider

Run

Ain't Got Nothin'

Seven Deaths Of You

Sweet City Ruin

Elena

Nightingale

This Land Has No Name

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Dan Jordan: Guitar / Vocals / Everything Else

Sam Harman: Electric Guitar / Slide

Matt Taylor: Electric Guitar (Ain't Got Nothin')

Mark Thomas: E-Piano (Elena)

Matt White: Piano / Organ (Ain't Got Nothin')

*Tracks 7 & 9 Written With: Sam Harman

Spotify: click here.

Apple Music: click here.

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Lyrics

Select An Album

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Ballad Of Bob Dylan

2011

Dan Jordan - War Is On.jpg

War Is On

2016

Dan Jordan - King After Midnight.jpg

King After Midnight

2018

Wine, Spirits, Tobacco.jpg

Wine, Spirits, Tobacco

2020

Live Takes (Part 1).jpg

Live Takes (Part I)

2020

(Lyrics not available)
Live Takes (Pt 2).jpg

Live Takes (Part II)

2020

(Lyrics not available)
Smoke signals.jpg

Smoke Signals

2020

Road To Ruin.jpg

Road To Ruin

2021

 
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Album / Single Reviews

"Dan Jordan & The Warbirds make music that is direct and from the heart. It is timeless song-crafting that revels in its making, its crooning, its guttural lyricism and its simple arrangement - carried out perfectly" - Swansea Fringe Festival.

 

"ROAD TO RUIN"

by: Get The Chance

Dan Jordan and The Warbirds evade categorisation. They are poetry. They are music. They are outlaw country. They are moody blues. They are folk storytelling. They are heavy metal vocals. The only seminal thread that runs through their latest album, Road to Ruin, is main man Dan’s clear connection to the music of Bob Dylan. He may not readily admit to such an influence being a conscious thing, but it is apparent that his time spent with Dylan over the course of his first album has had a lasting effect. His vocal delivery may not be to everyone’s taste, but one should at least be able to appreciate the hard-felt poetry that emanates from it.

Opening track Slow Burn may get off to a slow start but its first few moments of silence create a real sense of anticipation. A whirring cymbal then comes spinning into existence before being knocked sideways by the hard keys of a piano. It introduces the heavy beat which symbolises much of the album’s dark veneer, Jordan’s own smoky Dylan-esque vocals then coming in to add further shade. There is a sultry otherworldliness to the piano and electric guitar which gives it a certain intrigue and stops it descending into a black hole. The various mixing of genres, from the Latinized Country of Rider to the Metalized Blues of Run, have a similar effect, the poetic nature of Jordan’s lyrics also contributing to this sense of fascination which surrounds much of the album.

Each track is greeted with surprise. Each offers something slightly different from the rest. Ain’t Got Nothin’ may have a classic Blues structure but Matts White and Taylor bring some wonderful organ and electric guitar respectively to give it an added dimension. The soft and delicate composition on Seven Deaths of You creates a beautifully light atmosphere which allows deeper access into Jordan’s poetry. There is a real slice of folk storytelling here, delivered rather nicely through a deep voice that contains the faint presence of delicacy and vulnerability. Sweet City Ruin manages to uncover this further in lines like “stumbling through the city like a spectre” and “all you want is for the world to know that you were here” even as they are hidden behind the up-tempo, western swing style music.

There is a mythical quality to Elena which could be said to draw on folk tradition. The track that follows, Nightingale, certainly seems to suggest a strong folk influence upon Jordan’s work. His always gritty and grave delivery never allows for the same cadences that one might find among the typical folk singer however, meaning the loss of emotionality to some degree. What is lost here though is made up for in another unexpected musical addition, this time the introduction of pop elements followed by a sudden flurry of different instruments that take the album in a completely different direction. It means that, even as Jordan’s vocal starts to feel staid, there is enough originality to keep you listening right to the end.

Final track This Land has No Name is definitely worth sticking around for. On its musical surface is a wild west evoking landscape, complete with tolling bell and front porch guitar. It is the country music of the outlaws, reclaiming their rural roots from the urbanisation of an earlier sound. Dig a little deeper into the lyrics, and you begin to see the parallels. Yet this song speaks not of a place across the pond but a land much closer to home. Those “structures… crooked… battered” are the stone houses dotted across the countryside. The “roofs made of tin” are the barns stood in fields “still breathing [though] barely alive”. The bar, “as dry as a bone” and “the shops, boarded up” represent the communities who have lost their amenities to the forces of globalisation and capitalism. It is a depiction of Wales that is keenly felt and of which Dan Jordan seems acutely aware, no doubt garnered from his own geographical movement across the nation’s map. It is a protest song, if you will, inspired, whether conscious or not, by folk pioneers such as Bob Dylan, with a contemporary resonance that ensures Road to Ruin finishes with a political bang.

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"ROAD TO RUIN"

This is a really interesting album. At first, I thought the spoken lyrics were going to be a bit of a challenge over nine tracks, but this album is well put together and the lyrics are poetic with accomplished playing effective in a supporting role. Steel your ears and be prepared to give this album a thorough listen, because this is different and some of the songs will certainly be getting airplay on one of my shows.

Welsh born Dan Jordan leads, writes and plays guitar and piano for The Warbirds, a trio including Sam Harman (electric and slide guitar) and Patti Mynarska (violin) supported by a cast of other musicians. "Road to Ruin" comprises nine fairly long songs - just two under four minutes - that somehow never feel long. These are mainly songs of unrequited love, lyrically beautiful and mixing acoustic and rock, urban and country sounds, with carefully placed and superbly played key instruments never allowed to dominate.

You could draw numerous comparisons to this work but it never feels derivative. Jordan, like most musicians "likes others to say who he sounds like", and there are a few thoughts on that included in the brief song by song review below.

"Slow Burn" is slightly dark in its presentation with the spoken vocal, at times more of a whisper, feeling a little sinister until the ear becomes accustomed. The song appears to be about holding on to a fading love. Musically, the piano has echoes of Moby's "Play" album, and a lovely recurring guitar lick that reminds me of something Mark Knopfler might create.

"Rider" carries a Wild West style rhythm, evocative of Riders in the Sky, while at the same time having a Mike Scott & The Waterboys feel. Thankfully, this is music that id hard to place in any single genre. "Run" follows with a rocky, grungy sound with ZZ Top style guitar to drive it along.

"Ain't Got Nothin" is an acoustic rhythm and blues song, and the shortest song on the album. It feels a little sparse compared to the songs that have preceded it, but that works because of the song's length. The sound of rain introduces and closes "Seven Deaths of You", a track that has a feel of Stairway to Heaven. There is a really nice keyboard mood here, with some superb atmospheric electric blues guitar adding the cherry to the cake in this standout track.

A Hank Marvin style guitar introduces "Sweet City Ruin" backed by ukulele. The song is steady in its rhythm, and has a highly effective piano break around the half way mark. "Elena", with its Johnny Cash style follows, and there are some really nice music moments in this song.

"Nightingale" opens with acoustic guitar, and there are some terrific guitar moments in the build towards a powerful instrumental ending, as if playing on one of the song's own lyrics "sailing off the edge of each other's world".

"This Land Has No Name" is the album's closing track, and longest track. It has a "Seasons of Wither" (Aerosmith) style guitar opening then breaks into a piano led dark ballad, with lyrical highlights such as "one dusty road stretches on down the line / with buildings each side washed like teeth stained on wine". The song concludes with some lovely fuzz lead guitar, leading to something of a false ending on dobro. On first listen that felt out of place, but it quickly grows on you and provides some reflection time for the listener.

I very much enjoyed this album: not at all bad for songs recorded "using scrounged instruments and recording spaces".

John Reed

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"ROAD TO RUIN"

by: Pembrokeshire Online

We’ve featured Pembrokeshire-born musician Dan Jordan here before and make no apologies for doing so again – because he has just released a new album of truly original songs.


Road To Ruin by Dan Jordan and the Warbirds is strong stuff, heavy on atmosphere, poetic imagery and irresistible mystery. One can’t help but hear echoes of Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen in the dark drama of his voice. But the powerful maelstrom of images created by his songs is such that one wouldn’t be that surprised if Johnny Cash or Jim Morrison suddenly stumbled into the musical fray.


Dan is a teller of tales, some intimate and personal, some universal and apocalyptic. He also writes some brilliant lines: I particularly love: “We were done talking the moment you entered the room” on Run; or “You are so brittle and beautiful I know now why that dress clings so close to you” on Nightingale. And he often has the confidence in his own word visions to not be hemmed in by the need for a rhyme. His lyrics are set in perfectly intense musical backgrounds that encompass the influences of folk songs, ballads, blues and rock, almost always with effective and original use of percussion. Plus there are constant surprises: like a sudden switch into an electro-techy romp or a blast of thinking man’s heavy metal.


There is also some light relief among the darkness. His mischievous blues Ain’t Got Nothin’ has more than a little of Dylan’s Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat about it – and that’s meant as a compliment. But much of the time Dan conjurs up pictures of danger and menace, and riders on the storm, and landscapes of the end times (as in the closing This Land Has No Name).


Standout tracks? There isn’t one – because all nine songs here are equally as strong. And there are few albums one can say that about.

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"ROAD TO RUIN"

I approach Dan Jordan and the Warbirds with an open mind (as always) - he’s not someone I’ve come across before. Road To Ruin is possibly the sixth album by the Welsh singer and the first thing I notice is that this isn't 'run of the mill'.

So far so good. This reviewer is Welsh through and through but I must admit I'm not a huge fan of the last two decades of the Welsh rock sound. Seventies, eighties, Man, Budgie, Sassafras is more my Welsh cup of tea, however I digress.

Back to Warbirds and Road To Ruin. It's human nature that we as humans find it our duty, when listening to new music, to compare it with something else. Compare and contrast - as my sadistic Grammar school teachers loved to say.

There is a odd genre that The Warbirds tumble into and it's vocal driven. Possibly not even a genre - I haven't noticed it anywhere in HMV. Although it certainly exists and it's this: I'm going to call it 'Close Vocal'. If you haven't the foggiest, I'll cite the reader a few exquisite examples. Leonard Cohen, Mark Knopfler, Chris Rea, good ole Tom Waits. It's half sung, half spoken. It's storytelling, conversational even. Well, that's where I am with Dan Jordan and the Warbirds. I'm also on the spoken song with this one - a la Sunscreen (Baz Luhrmann), 19 (Paul Hardcastle, although that was a documentary sample I believe) and hell, The Streets (Mike Skinner, Dry Your Eyes).

And hey actually, that's no bad thing. It's grim in places but so is life. Very grim in some places. Which makes a pleasant (possibly not the best word) change from the hedonistic Eloi (see: HG Wells) and the unicorn and rainbow mentality and the autotune slush we're usually force-fed.


This Close Vocal (patent pending: N Evans) is growing on me. A word about the music: It's varied. The music happens and I wasn't thrown by any of it. Probably because Dan Jordan's voice commands the whole outing. Citing Cohen, Knopfler and Waits might have been unfair. Then again, if you're gonna steal, steal from the rich. And in this day and age of obscene inequality, obscene wealth, starvation, industrial pollution, spineless corrupt politicians, post-covid climate burnout, etc maybe

we should let Dan weave his theft magic on Musk and Bezos and the rest of the clown billionaires. Phew!

Nonetheless, he leaves the best until last: This Land Has No Name. The bitter end. Replete with grand piano, grim as f*&k, Cooder Dobro, spaghetti western church bells, Crazy Horse Les Pauls, it's Armageddon writ large. I'm put in mind of another Close Vocal classic comparison now: Roy Buchanan's The Messiah Will Come Again. Oh, hang on - he's here.

Dan Jordan and the Warbirds: Road To Ruin is out now.

Nigel is an award winning film director, journalist and acclaimed musician.

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"SLOW BURN" 

“Slow Burn” is the new single by trio Dan Jordan & The Warbirds.


The track is a slow paced simple composition with lyrics spoken. The theme is one of feeling a strange comfort in a lie “to keep building on this lie just to watch it burn away”. It would appear to be more of a poem about letting something go, whether it’s yourself, a situation or life. Dan himself is described as a songwriter and storyteller. I feel “Slow Burn” has that storytelling vibe, and sometimes that can portray more emotion than vocals over a full band.


The lyrics are ambiguous, the slow burn could be a description about depression,
addiction, loss or breakdown of a relationship, maybe the emotional chaos thrown upon us during lockdowns and uncertainty over the past year. One of the most obvious things is the feeling of aiming or searching for something meaningless (“If it doesn’t mean a thing why bother to see it through?”)


“Slow Burn” is quite an unusual song, the story or poetic feel gives it more of a unique edge. Definitely something different which stands out from the rest.

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"SMOKE SIGNALS" - E.P.

For a song to bear repeated hearings, it has to have not only an appealing unity of music and words, but also a certain depth and mystery.

The tracks on the new four-track EP, Smoke Signals, from Pembrokeshire singer/songwriter Dan Jordan tick all those boxes beautifully.

On Darlin’, Don’t Go Easy Dan’s gruff, unearthly voice, the heavy lyrics and the swampy feel are strongly reminiscent of some of the fine work Bob Dylan created in the 1980s and 1990s with Daniel Lanois in the producer’s chair. The atmosphere is palpably electric.

Dan says that Water Horse originates from the Pembrokeshire version of a Welsh folk tale about “a creature that resides close to water and has the ability to change form to lure and play tricks on lost travellers”. It’s certainly spooky stuff and here, with the insistent rhythm, and Dan’s rough poetics offset by the pure vocals of Julie Urquhart, there are shades of Leonard Cohen.

A touch of Neil Young-esque harmonica takes us into Bronze and Blue, another slice of lyrical mystery.


And the record ends with Assume I’m Wearing Back which has more of that Dylan/Cohen/Kurt Weill Sprechstimme (half-spoken, half-sung) delivery, this time in waltz time. “When I said I loved you, it was wild exaggeration…” is such a great line…

The fact I’ve mentioned other great singers and songwriters here is meant as a compliment not a criticism. Dan Jordan definitely has his own voice and his own approach to singing, writing and recording. The stripped back instrumentation, mostly provided by Dan, on Smoke Signals, has more impact than a full-blown production ever could. Everything in this bare setting seems to be in its rightful place and creates real drama .

Smoke signals, along with rhythms and voices, are among the oldest forms of human communication – often sending out a warning. These Smoke Signals from Dan Jordan are very clear: they announce the presence among us of a notable poetic and musical talent.

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"SMOKE SIGNALS" - E.P.

It's been a busy year for Dan Jordan with some high profile (and high quality) releases. His Tom Waits / Leonard Cohen / Dylan / Brecht delivery is very well suited to the songs and, if anything, makes them stand out from the usual fare ! Think darkened rooms with a smoky haze, a barman polishing glasses - it's a scene straight out of LA confidential, but what makes this instalment different is the inclusion of strings on the opening track. And you know what ? It really works, as does the Hammond on 'Bronze & Blue'. Smoke Signals is like the big brother to what's come before and it's like watching a favourite child reach, if not adulthood, maybe its teenage years - we can only hold our breath and see what comes next. Whatever it is you can bet it'll be something special !

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"BRONZE & BLUE"

A game, noble attempt at locking Bob Dylan and Neil Young in a room with Tom Waits and Leonard Cohen (and Lou Reed) to write a song together. This one has it all in terms of sonic cultural referencing, and although it can't ever be the equal of its aspirational role models, it is a compelling example of what happens when an artist wears his heart (of gold?) on his sleeve without apology. To be honest, I've always wanted to do the Cohen vocal thing, so maybe I should quit while I'm ahead and just put a call into this guy for some lessons.

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"BRONZE & BLUE"

“A very idiosyncratic style, somewhere between Charles Bukowski and Leonard Cohen”

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"BRONZE & BLUE"

Dan is a singer/songwriter from Wales and this is the second review we have done for him after his very impressive last album; "Wine, Spirits, Tobacco".

Bronze and Blue continues Dan's amazing storytelling. With his very unique and distinctive voice this song has all the makings of being another great success.

One thing that always stands out for me is the musical backing of the song. I love a good tune, one that leaves you wanting to continue through by keeping you gripped and Dan has this down to tee. His storytelling is another stand out feature of the songs. You get a sense of Bob Dylan meets David Attenborough, a weird analogy, I know, but you have that song style of Bob Dylan mixed in with the silk and warming vocals of David Attenborough -  this gives you "Bronze and Blue".


I am a big fan of Dan and his music. His uniqueness and his originality continues to stand out and we can't wait to hear what is next.

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"WINE, SPIRITS, TOBACCO"

Comparisons with Tom Waits are always going to be made with Dan Jordan's "Warbirds" but the question is whether this is a good thing in a time when we're losing our cultural heroes to the old Grim Reaper. We need new heroes to carry the torch onward and provide an escape from the mundanities of life. That's not to say that poor old Tom Waits is going anywhere just yet - but it's good to be prepared !

Dan is slowly building up an impressive back catalogue of music and since 2011 has released 4 albums, starting with the "Ballad of Bob Dylan", "War Is On" and "King After Midnight" - this most recent, "Wine, Spirits, Tobacco" is quite possibly his most satisfying to date. It's a well rounded collection of original songs delivered stylishly and not lacking in commercial punch with even touches of Johnny Cash's impudent swagger.

The perfect soundtrack to the latest dust bowl drama from Netflix - we love it.

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"WINE, SPIRITS, TOBACCO"

We recently listened to the new album from Dan Jordan (and his shopping list): Wine, Spirits, Tobacco.

A very intriguing opening, really soothing vocals, lovely backing and yeah, it works so well - so Bob Dylan. This is the opening song "Blood and Tears". Dan's voice, as unusual as it is, really keeps me gripped. It’s like he’s telling you a story and you want to know where it’s going next. This is shown on "You All Lose Your Charm (In The End)". I also really enjoyed the guitar solo in this song, reminds me a bit of Chris Rea.

"Leave Them Alone", "Corpse Candles" and "Gosiame" continue this laid back, country/folk storytelling - Really enjoying this album so far. Musically the backing is amazing, vocally, I have never heard vocals done this way before and I am so very impressed.

"Bridges Burn (Dirt and County)"; this is a lovely song and continues the story perfectly. "Ode to Love, These Wasted Years", this is my highlight of the album. Amazing backing, the song fits Dan’s voice perfectly. Though I really enjoyed listening to this, I can’t get "The First Noel" our of my head now.

"Holding On" and "Lonesome Country Blues #13" finish off this really wonderful album.


Overall, a few words really describe this album; Unique, edgy, storytelling. It's so intriguing that it works to perfection. I really can’t wait until the next time I get music from Dan, I really enjoyed this.


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"KING AFTER MIDNIGHT"

Taking inspiration from (in his own words) the “crude” recording approach of the country/folk artists of the early twentieth century, Cardiff based singer/songwriter and storyteller Dan Jordan in 'King After Midnight' has created a atmospheric album that wears the influences of Tom Waits, Bob Dylan and the like on its sleeve. With Dan creating the artwork as well as engineering the Recording & Mixing this is a true 'home-brew' album that reminds us that there is still a place in the modern world for music in which the heart lies in the moment; of which Dan states “The songs on these records have always been very 'of the time/moment' and like to think that the crude recordings kinda reflect this; I mean the recordings themselves are mostly made up of first takes!”.


Opening track 'Blood Ash Hill' is the stand out track for me in this album, weaving ominous & abstract lyrics with a brooding groove telling a tale of a vengeful figure fighting corruption and evil. This is an album that doesn't stand still shifting from the aforementioned brooding feel of 'Blood Ash Hill' to the melodic 'Bring Me Back' then later in the album the riff-y 'Rebelvision' which would not sound out of place if backed by Crazy Horse.


Over its forty-eight minutes, 'King After Midnight' delivers a varied set of songs with its influences of heavily felt. A less direct and obscure feel than Dan's previous protest-centric effort - 2016's 'War Is On...' this album shows a shift to the ominous which suits the delivery. 

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Gallery

Featuring Photographs and works by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan Jordan: Collection

Dan Jordan: Collection

Photo by: Nikola Rysová

Dan & Sam

Dan & Sam

Live At Swansea

Dan & Sam

Dan & Sam

Live In Cardiff

Dan Jordan & The Warbirds

Dan Jordan & The Warbirds

Live At Newcastle

Dan, Sam & Patti

Dan, Sam & Patti

Dan Jordan & The Warbirds

Dan

Dan

Technical Difficulties

Dan & Sam

Dan & Sam

Studio Time

 
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Contact

Have an idea, questions or query? - Please feel free to get in touch!

Based in Cardiff, Wales.

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Upcoming Events

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    COVID-19: No listings yet
    Cardiff
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    Cardiff, Cardiff, UK
  • The Swansea Fringe Festival
    Swansea
    24 Oct, 15:00
    Swansea, 8b Strand, Swansea SA1 2AE, UK
    This year's celebration of music, comedy, spoken word (and everything else we can cram in!)